Copenhagen Street Food is now Reffen | Where to Eat Outside This Summer

Sustainable Cuisine and Craft Come Together in Copenhagen

Like a phoenix from the ashes, Copenhagen Street Food has risen again. This time better than before and with a broader concept. More than just food carts in a warehouse, Reffen is striving to “hack the future” and create a space where sustainable cuisine, craft and culture can co-mingle.

Reffen is the reincarnation of the former Papirøen (“Paper Island”) warehouse on the Copenhagen canal chock full of old shipping containers turned food carts. Closed after four years and millions of visitors later, Copenhagen has been missing the unique and creative culinary offerings of the old Papirøen establishment. While other food markets have cropped up, including West Market in Vesterbro, the Tivoli Food Hall and the newly minted Bridge Street Market (Broens Gadekøkken) near the old Noma, none have quite the vibe of the old Copenhagen Street Food. Reffen is a little further afield than the original, but I believe worthy of the effort. Come see why you should check out Reffen in its newest iteration.

Continue reading “Copenhagen Street Food is now Reffen | Where to Eat Outside This Summer”

A Sweet Slice of Nostalgia at The American Pie Company in Copenhagen

Authentic Americana and Apple Pie in the heart of Copenhagen
ALMOST TASTES LIKE HOME

Care to share a sweet slice of authentic Americana right in the middle of Copenhagen? It’s as easy as pie. Except that I had yet to try. Until yesterday, when I finally succumbed to step inside The American Pie Company in the center of the city, which has been charming locals and garnering nominations for the City’s Best (Byens Bedste) Awards since it flung open its button-cute café in 2015. What took me so long you might ask? Wouldn’t a nice piece of pumpkin, pecan or key lime pie be the perfect palliative for any potential bout of pining for home? Yer darn tootin’ it could be. However, I’ve resisted. Until now. Continue reading “A Sweet Slice of Nostalgia at The American Pie Company in Copenhagen”

Eat This Above the Arctic Circle | Tastes of Northern Norway | Oregon Girl Around the World

Oh Dear Cod | Eat This Above the Arctic Circle in Northern Norway

From Cod to Kanelsnurr to Cloudberries 

Let’s Taste Northern Norway

Ah Norway. The big brother of the Scandinavian siblings. To me, Norway is like the tall, athletic hulky older brother who braves Arctic temperatures and winters without light while running up mountains with kids on his back to all ski down; he believes that every problem can be solved simply by going outside.

In comparison, sweet tow-headed sister Sweden – she’s got flowers in her hair, shares her land but waves from a canoe as she paddles out to her archipelagos to forage for lingonberries in her cute clogs and colorful clothes.

Denmark is the moody little brother whose lands aren’t as large, but is still happy ’cause – you know, hygge – and he thinks his sibs aren’t quite as cool as he cruises by on a bike wearing skinny pants and fancy white trainers while sipping a locally roasted small batch coffee on the way to the latest craft beer release. (Ok, maybe that’s just the Copenhagen version.)

But Norway, he is rugged. It’s true. Norway is. Whether you think Norwegians are or not. The landscape here surges from the sea in stark sharp peaks and fierce fjords. And so much sea. In fact, Norway has more coastline than most countries in the world. Only 7 countries have more.¹ And 90% of all Norwegians live in places by the sea.²  Think Vikings and hearty bearded fisherman. Or just people who eat fish. Lots and lots of fish.

My not-quite Norwegian with his not so impressive catch!

Yep. You guessed it. Seafood is supreme in this coastal country. Now you sea it. Norway is actually the second largest exporter of seafood in the world.³ With their clean, clear waters and a sustainable population of migrating fish species, it is easy to see why. So naturally, the diet here is dominated by food plucked from the cold waters. Especially above the Arctic Circle. And you should try some. Here’s what and here’s why. Continue reading “Oh Dear Cod | Eat This Above the Arctic Circle in Northern Norway”

Come taste Copenhagen on a Food Tour

Come to Copenhagen she said!

Ok. I always say that. And you should. There are really so many reasons and never a wrong season to see the compact Danish capital full of colorful culture and creative cuisine. Cuisine you say? Yes! I’m talking about tasting this town today. And there are some delicious options to dine on when visiting in the Danish capital.

All around the world, foodies know of Copenhagen’s New Nordic culinary scene. We have Michelin stars and forageable foodstuffs. But what if you didn’t nab a table at Noma or Geranium? And maybe wood ants on moss isn’t your thing. Maybe it is? Don’t knock it until you try it, I say.

And try things you should. If you are anything like me, you can agree that travel should include a tour through a city’s culinary culture. You like to see what a town can taste like. So especially if your time in a place is limited, taking a tour can be the perfect way to see a side of a city that you might not know how to seek out. Continue reading “Come taste Copenhagen on a Food Tour”

Making Macarons in Copenhagen with a Terrible French Pastry Class

Day out in the Danish Capital

LEARN TO MAKE MACARONS

I adore French macarons. Those pretty, crunchy, chewy ganache filled little round cookies that people line sidewalks in Paris to procure. If you love Ladurée but live in Copenhagen, you are in luck. You can learn to make them yourself. From a French pastry master. Frédéric Terrible has been creating and cooking delightful French desserts in the Danish capital for over twenty years. He runs the Terrible French Pastry School in Frederiksberg.

TERRIBLE FRENCH PASTRY SCHOOL

I recently spent a not-terrible-at-all afternoon learning tips and tricks about the tasty treats with a group of friends. Frédéric has a lovely light filled space on a quiet street off Gammel Kongevej and can host your group outing easily. Birthday party? Bachelorette party? Team-building? Oui oui! Don’t have a group? No problem. Regularly scheduled classes allow for individual participation as well.

Think macarons are hard work? Not under the master’s close supervision. Frédéric breaks down the process and gives you all the tools to succeed. We used an Italian meringue recipe in this class, as it is more lenient and easier for us newbies to work with than the traditional French version, Frédéric explained. We worked in teams of two to boil the sugar to just the right temperature and then carefully add it to the whipping egg whites for our meringues. This glossy white mixture was then added to an almond flour base and blended by hand to the perfect consistency. Not too little, not too much.

After watching the technique demonstrated for us, we piped in pairs, filling our trays in a variety of colored batters. Once in the oven, we watched and we waited for the cookies to rise. Do they have a “foot” asks Frédéric? Yes? Oui! Then adjust the temp and time for a break. As the cookies finished baking, we enjoyed coffee, tea and (of course) macarons in a separate party room set up for our group.

Once cooled, we popped the pieces off the paper and got them ready for filling. Today we took a condensed version of the class and did not make the ganache centers ourselves. Frédéric had already prepared a variety of flavors for us to fill. He quickly shared his process and preference for all-natural ingredients. We used salted caramel, raspberry, coffee, chocolate and of course – licorice – this class IS in Denmark. Once full, they get five minutes in the freezer to set the cookies for travel.  We get to pack a mixed box to take home.

FRENCH PASTRY CLASS DEETS:

Terrible French Pastry School
Grundtvigsvej 10 A – 1864 Frederiksberg C

2.5 Hour Class
300 DKK includes ingredients, instruction, coffee/tea and pastries
Minimum of 8 participants

NOTE: The condensed macaron class is called Bachelorette Party on the website.

Other pastry class options, as well as the full macaron lesson including the ganache filling, can be found at Frederic’s site online. He offers classes for children, but suggests that they work best for ages 8 and older.

 

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