Faraway Files #38

TRAVEL BLOG COMMUNITY

THIRTY-EIGHT WEEKS OF SHARING TRAVEL STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Hej from Copenhagen! We’ve had a blast in a summer house on the Danish island of Bornholm right as school set out, but our real summer vacation starts this weekend and I am feeling free as a bird. My husband and I will soon be soaking up the midnight sun above the Arctic Circle to celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary. What a long strange trip it’s been. In all the best ways.

That is a long time. And we’ve been around the world. I feel so grateful that we have been able to share some of it with our children. But this trip. It’s just for us. We’re headed to the Lofoten Islands in northern Norway. I am seriously excited. And apparently, we seek out islands to mark important dates in our relationship.

We spent our honeymoon in the Cayman Islands; our first real holiday that we saved and paid for our own selves. For our 10th anniversary, we explored stunning San Juan Island in Washinton State. I can’t definitively tell you where the next 10 years will take us, but I wish only for a continued sense of adventure, curiosity and wonder. Together.

 I’ll be updating my Instagram stories from the road if you want to come follow along! I see mountains and fjords in my immediate future. What about you? Off to somewhere fun? Just back from an amazing experience? Do share! Take us some place far away! Today I’m sharing a little lesson in how to hygge in a Danish summer house. Don’t worry, these rules aren’t strict. Just there to help everyone enjoy. As it turns out the Danish concept of hygge has a lot to do with community.

As Faraway Files hosts, Katy, Clare and I love our link up and this supportive travel community. With over 130 contributors, we have read about 80 countries and territories around the world. If you join in and leave a link please reciprocate and comment on the hosts’ posts as well as at least two others that spark an interest. If we see a pattern of people not joining in, sadly we have decided to remove the links of those posters in the future.

Here are my favorite posts from last week!


Favorites Week 37

Do you ever feel like everyone you know is in one place and you aren’t? That’s how I feel about Greece this summer. Seems like everyone has been blown in that direction and when you catch the beauty of Kos – you can see why. Cathy of Mummy Travels shows us what to see and where to feel the bubbles at the beach. Curious? Check out her post!

11 THINGS TO DO IN KOS WITH KIDS | Mummy Travels

If you haven’t met Nicky and Dave of Go Live Young, pop over and say hej! They took their three boys around the world and this week shared what to do in and around Beijing. Beautiful and inspiring pics!

FIVE DAYS IN BEIJING | Go Live Young

Do you ever get a little bit obsessed with a place because you see it all over your social media accounts or in every must do list that floats over your news feed? Svalbard is one of those places for our family, mostly from my teenage son who has put it at the top of his travel wish list for awhile now. But thanks to Vanessa at Snow in Tromso for keeping it real and giving us the low down on what to expect and where to stay when planning a visit to this far north Norwegian territory.

This week I’m teaching a little about that oh so Danish concept of hygge and how to find it in a summer house. There are a few rules on how to rent a sommerhus and how to make it happy for all when here visiting Denmark. Don’t worry – everyone can handle these rules. Happy summer from Scandiland!


FARAWAY FILES TRAVEL BLOG COMMUNITY LINKUP #38
WANT TO JOIN IN?

Jump in! The water is fine! Faraway Files is a creative community of travel bloggers who inspire and share each other’s posts. All three hosts will try to read and comment on every post and we’ll share them on social media too. Each week we’ll choose our favorites and highlight them on our blogs and social media channels using #FarawayFiles.

HOW IT WORKS:
  • Link up one travel-related post and add the Faraway Files badge onto the post or your blog (code below) or link back to the hosts.
  • The link up will go live every Thursday at 8 am UK time (9 am, CET) until midnight on Friday. It will alternate between Untold Morsels, Suitcases and Sandcastles, and Oregon Girl around the World.
  • Link ups work best if everyone shares so please comment on all three of the hosts’ posts and at least two others.

LINK UP HERE TODAY ON OREGON GIRL AROUND THE WORLD

TWEET US YOUR POSTS

(@suitandsand, @UntoldMorsels, @oregongirlworld) using the hashtag #FarawayFiles and we’ll retweet to our followers.

SHARE TRAVEL IMAGES ON INSTAGRAM

Tag @FarawayFiles and #FarawayFiles – and we’ll repost our favorites.


WE’LL PIN YOUR LINKS

We are posting each week’s links on community Pinterest page – join in over there.


FIND US ON FACEBOOK

Find Faraway Files on Facebook. Like us. We’ll like your page. We’re friendly that way.


GRAB BADGE CODE HERE:
Oregon Girl Around the World
 Loading InLinkz ...

Danish Summer House Rules

How to Find a House to Hygge in when you visit Denmark

Want to know how the Danes do summer? Simple. Seek out a summer house. And find your own hygge. That communal sense of slowing down and focusing on being together in a comfortable place with your family or friends. You’ll be grateful once you find it. But know that there are rules about how to hygge in a Danish sommerhus. But what if you don’t know the rules? Don’t worry. I’m here to help. And give you some tips on how to find one.

The Danish summer house is simple. And cozy. Not lavish or large. A cottage. A home. Near the sea. Clean and concise. Like the Danes. And dare I say it – darn hyggeligt. You may have heard this Danish word hygge. Lots and lots of posts and books and articles have been written about it, how the Danes have it, how it makes them happy. How you need it in your life. How to get it in your life. Danes also love that hygge is untranslatable. Somehow that makes it theirs alone. And while I appreciate that much of the Danish language feels untranslatable, I don’t believe this is true. You too can feel hygge. You don’t have to be Danish. And a sommerhus is a wonderful place to try.”

Summer House Hygge, Oregon Girl Around the World

Get outside the city

Come to Copenhagen she said. In fact, I say it all the time. But don’t stay here for your entire visit to Denmark. There is so much more to this country than the capital. And much of it is along the coast. Did you know that there is no place in Denmark that is more than 52 kilometers from the water? And there are so many charming villages and towns to see along the seaside. Heading for a break near the water is a very Danish respite. And most likely it happens in a summer house. A Danish sommerhus. 


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #1:

Find a place to unplug near nature.


WHERE TO SUMMER HOUSE IN DENMARK

The “Danish Riviera” stretches across the northern part of Sjælland from Helsingør to charming towns and beautiful sandy beaches starting in Hornbæk, Gilleleje, Tisvildeleje, and Liseleje. Or roll through Roskilde and head out towards Odsherred and Rørvig.

On the north west coast of Jutland, summer house communities began developing around stunning Skagen at the top of Denmark as well towns like Løkken and Blokhus along the North Sea coastline. Or further south try the island of Fanø.

Don’t forget Funen in the middle and the archipelago of islands that litter its southern shore. Look to Æro and Helnæs.

But the best place, I now believe, is Bornholm. An island off the coast of southern Sweden, Bornholm is a beautiful Danish microcosm of cozy. There are so many opportunities to discover summer house hygge here.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #2:

Bring people together.


Summer house Agencies

Every local tourist board has links to summer houses for rent in their region. But the following booking sites have the largest selections across the country and can help you find that special place to bring your people together and create those hygge memories.

Dansommer.com

Dansommer has one of the largest online collections of summer houses in Denmark. Here you can search for houses based on your specific needs, wants and desires. I love that you can filter for homes that are energy efficient and by their distance to the water.

Novasol.com

Sister company to Dansommer, sharing many offices and resources across the country. Both companies are part of the larger Wyndham Vacation Properties.

SolOgStrand.com

Sol og Strand, or “sun and beach” in English, is a Denmark specific summer house agency and prides themselves in knowing and helping with not only the vacation rental, but activities and sight near your rental. They have 5800 rental properties and strive for quality over quantity.

Dancenter.com

With 10,000 houses, Dancenter has the largest collection of homes to let online.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #3:

Make it comfy.


BRING YOUR OWN SHEETS:

The easiest way to get comfy is carrying along your own linens. It is standard for Danish summer houses to provide the duvets and pillows, but you will need to bring your own covers, sheets and towels.

Visiting Denmark from somewhere else? Don’t have space in your hand luggage for all that? Don’t worry, you can rent a linen package from the different rental agencies.

Linen Package usually includes:
Duvet/pillow case, sheet for 1 person, 1 towel, 1 big bathing towel, 1 kitchen towel and 1 cloth. Costs around 100 DKK per person.

Doesn’t seem as cozy to borrow sheets? You can get comfy by bringing casual clothes to curl up in with your closest friends.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #4:

Share good food.


FOOD AND DRINK

Find the local fish shop or smokehouse for local delicacies. Support the nearby farm stand and buy some new potatoes or fresh rhubarb and strawberries. Pick ripe red currants, known as ribs in these parts. Cooking together and eating definitely together ups your hygge factor.

And don’t fret, all Danish summer houses will have dishes, utensils, cookware, and glasses for your use. Basic appliances like coffee maker, toaster and sometimes microwave may be available. If it is important for your holiday stay, make sure to clarify before booking. Any and all food and drink will be yours to bring or buy along the way.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #5

Turn down the lights.


ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IS EXTRA

It is normal and expected that you will be responsible for paying for how much electricity you use during your stay. (And sometimes water.) When you pick up your keys, you will receive a sheet to denote the starting meter measure when you arrive at the house. You can ask ahead what average consumption prices are for each specific house before renting.

Since you are paying for it, use less of it. Unplug and turn down. It’s greener AND more hyggeligt. Light some candles. Make a fire if there is a wood stove or a fire pit. Roasting marshmallows together or as the Danes do, cooking bread on a stick is a great way to create hygge.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #6

Everyone pitches in.


CLEANING AT THE END

In Denmark, you take your shoes off when inside. Doing so will help when it’s time to clean at the end. Summer houses need to be left in tip top shape and the cleaning is your responsibility unless you book a final clean service with the rental agency. This can be booked before hand or at the time of arrival. Final cleaning fees vary depending on house size, but can add up to 1200 DKK on the total price. ($180 USD, €160)

Care to clean it yourself and save some kroner? Bring your own vinegar and baking soda or purchase at the local market. And make sure everyone pitches in. Hygge is about equality. There are no tall poppies here in Denmark and tasks should be shared. An egalitarian “many hands make light work,” ensures everyone contributes for the good of the group.


DANISH SUMMER HOUSE RULE #7

Be present.


Hygge makes you happy

Slow down. Get comfortable. Be casual. No drama. Play games. Eat food. Be together. Turn off the phone. Set aside some time each day to come together and consciously be together. Find when it best suits your peeps. This is your place to feel peace. With each other. With yourself. This is hygge.  

MORE SUMMER HOUSE TIPS:
IMPORTANT TO NOTE:
  • Normal Danish summer house rentals run one week from Saturday to Saturday.
  • Check in time is between 14:00-19:00. After hours arrivals need to be arranged ahead.
  • Keys are normally picked up at a central location, not the house itself.
  • Consumption of electricity is paid at the end.
  • Check out time is 10:00.
  • Peak rental time is during Danish school holidays between weeks 26-31 (late June to early August).
  • Renting a summer house off-peak is cheaper and can be even cozier.
FACTS ABOUT DANISH SUMMER HOUSES
  • 55% of all foreign tourist stays in Denmark are in a summer house.
  • There are over 200,000 summer homes in Denmark. About 40,000 of them are available for rent.
  • 90% of all Danish summer home rentals are members of the Danish Association of Holiday House Letters.
  • Since 1973, when Denmark joined the European Union, foreigners have not been allowed to buy a Danish summer house.
  • If you have special connections to Denmark or a specific house, you can apply for a limited number of exceptions to the above rule each year.
  • Denmark saw a huge summer house building boom in the late 1960’s and 1970’s when the Danish economy was growing.
  • All of the building prompted a law in 1977 that forbids building on the sea front and requires a 3 kilometer set back from the beach, making it difficult to find a water front property to rent.
  • You are not allowed to live year-round in a summer house unless you are a pensioner (retiree).

Live like a local. Seek out a sommerhus.

For more about hygge – check out Meik Wiking’s A Little Book of Hygge | Danish Secrets to Happy Living.

Find your own house to hygge in. Simple rules and tools for renting and relaxing in a Danish summer house when visiting Denmark.

Oregon Girl Around the World

Faraway Files #37

TRAVEL BLOG COMMUNITY

THIRTY-SEVEN WEEKS OF SHARING TRAVEL STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Hello travel fans! A day later and a euro short, but I’m here for Faraway Files number thirty-seven. Yes, it’s Friday – but there is still time to check in, link up and catch up on some amazing travel inspiration. Me? I’m just back from Berlin to see U2 in concert at the Olympiastadion. It was fantastisch! That’s German for fantastic. I’ll be sharing more about big bold Berlin later, but I didn’t want the week to pass without throwing a few shout outs to some of the great posts from last week. So without further ado, here are my favorites from last week’s linkup. Missed it? No worries – check in here.

Favorites Week 36

Living in Scandinavia, we’ve become a little Viking-obsessed, so I was fascinated to read Bryna’s post about the Viking explorers who settled in Newfoundland, Canada. Head over to Dotted Line Travels and say hej!

L’ANSE AUX MEADOWS: VIKING SETTLEMENT IN CANADA | Dotted Line Travels

Juliette from Snorkels to Snow shares 17 great tips to consider when planning your first trip to Japan. From saving money at lunch to making sure you have cash and taking off your shoes when inside, they are great ideas to tuck in your travel planning. And – SUSHI.

17 TIPS FOR VISITING JAPAN FOR THE FIRST TIME | Snorkels to Snow

Time to head to Spain with Charly of Pod Travels and see all the amazing things to do around Aragon with or without a family in tow. From stunning architecture to natural wonders to dinosaur discovering – there is something for everyone. I personally would LOVE to do the white water rafting!


And finally – walk with Sharon of Exploring Our World over the iconic Golden Gate Bridge. A beautiful day out with stunning views of the Bay.
WALKING THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE | Exploring Our World

FARAWAY FILES TRAVEL BLOG COMMUNITY LINKUP #37
WANT TO JOIN IN?

We’d love you to join us in building this supportive and growing community who will inspire and share each other’s posts. All three hosts will try to read and comment on every post and we’ll share them on social media too. Each week we’ll choose our favorites and highlight them on our blogs and social media channels using #FarawayFiles.

HOW IT WORKS:
  • Link up one travel-related post and add the Faraway Files badge onto the post or your blog (code below) or link back to the hosts.
  • The link up will go live every Thursday at 8 am UK time (9 am, CET) until midnight on Friday. It will alternate between Untold Morsels, Suitcases and Sandcastles, and Oregon Girl around the World.
  • Link ups work best if everyone shares so please comment on all three of the hosts’ posts and at least two others.

HEAD OVER TO UNTOLD MORSELS AND LINK UP BY MIDNIGHT BST

TWEET US YOUR POSTS

(@suitandsand, @UntoldMorsels, @oregongirlworld) using the hashtag #FarawayFiles and we’ll retweet to our followers.

SHARE TRAVEL IMAGES ON INSTAGRAM

Tag @FarawayFiles and #FarawayFiles – and we’ll repost our favorites.


WE’LL PIN YOUR LINKS

We are posting each week’s links on community Pinterest page – join in over there.


FIND US ON FACEBOOK

Find Faraway Files on Facebook. Like us. We’ll like your page. We’re friendly that way.


Untold Morsels